Tom Levers

Rumors of Facebook?

Posted in BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT, MARKETING by Tom Levers on September 25, 2010

The New Age of the Consumer

Posted in MARKETING by Tom Levers on June 4, 2009

Have you seen Google’s “Wave” for email?

Google noticed that the novice consumer does not like email! Why would they, with every company offering it free so that half the inbox fills up with junk, and people can’t sort the good from the bad… it is just not doing the job!

This is why consumers use IM, Facebook, and Twitter.  It takes the current status quo and completely shatters it. Wave is part of  what may be an integral piwaveece in a new, richer world of online functionality (a new communication ecosystem”).

Google is slowly assembling a critical mass of SaaS applications that threatens to change the legacy applications from Microsoft. Sure there will always be a need for local applications, but is consumer communicating and social connecting one of these… if I were Microsoft, this would be keeping me up at night.

Xerox/IBM-Microsoft /Apple broke down the old technologies of the computer world by merging the mini computer operating system services with a graphical user experience . This is our  20+ year foundation since the 80 ‘s.

The concept of desktop applications, has started to move into the new world of SaaS. Google is one large organization that is not bound by the challenge of legacy influences and profit margins, and is building a new world order because of its “Green Field Products”.

Twitter, Facebook, etc… these type of innovators can try over and over with technology until it becomes accepted by consumers that are willing to adopt new revolutionary concepts that improve their lifestyle.  Business can not afford to take these risks, because of their legacy investment and processes. So consumers will drive the next technology change in collaborative communication devices and computing. Once consumers adopt the new order, business will follow in these new service areas. Collaboration is presently controled by the legacy of business, it will be consumers that will adopt new inovation and new technologies that demand we have something better.

SEO is behavioral

Posted in MARKETING by Tom Levers on January 5, 2009

 

semWhat does Web search have to do with behavior?

 

Everything!

 

Did you know that if you have a B 2 B site that has not been modified in 6 months you have lost significant readers, prospects and sales. This is because GOOGLE is becoming more and more behavioral. Behavior is the Google direction to improve the quality of their ranking algorithm.

 

I won’t go into who’s money funded these qualitative findings, or why, or how, or who in GOOGLE guided me (like deep throat) threw to the conclusions below. But my investigation was founded on other SEO experts that have made the same conclusions from their quantitative perspective. So, here are a few of the more current  issues that are now impacted by search algorithms.

 

For SEO professionals or The Person Who Got Stuck With SEO, its time to make sure you are focused on three areas:

  • Usability – Be helpful to those who have reached your site. Looking at how people get to your site is easy,  more importantly get more people to stay on your site.
  • Analytics – It is not just measuring if keywords work or do not work, you’d better be good at analyzing the metrics to identify why and where you should make site improvements.
  • Writing – Be a consultative thought leader not a blatant promoter.

Behavior is the Google direction to improve the quality of their ranking algorithm. Here are the facts to improving your web rankings:

 

Search Behavior Fact 1:  Impressions are Nothing and Click-Thru is everything.

People who click on a native search listing versus those who see it and don’t click will tell Google you are more accurately addressing “the search need”. Those who are chosen to fulfill the need are rewarded in ranking.  This means your copy should be aligned with the most relevant and current topics… obviously, but without getting into the details, if you have not changed your web copy / topics recently, you are being penalized.

 

Search Behavior Fact 2: Bounce Rate Impacts Ranking.

Search engines are  incorporating user behavior data, like bounce rate, into their algorithms. How many visitors from organic search look at one page and leave without clicking to another page? The more folks that leave, the higher your bounce rate. So don’t generate traffic that promotes hit and run, search algorithms will interpret it as abandoned visitors. A high bounce rate impacts your ranking.

 

Search Behavior Fact 3: Time On your Site Impacts Ranking.

The amount of time someone spends on your web site from their search query will impact ranking. This is why building thought leadership and good usability to flow through your site is critical.

 

I have heard from some very “in the know Google types”, and I am now reading it from other search experts that “time on the site” impsearch-engine-marketingroves organic rankings.  What you need to do is to deliver value to your reader: Clarify your offer, and watch your analytics.

Make sure your description and tags are aligned with your current site. To improved time on site give people what they expect when they click on your listing in the search results. Take a leadership role by educating to increase interest. Track your organic landing pages vs. your paid. Organic search engines pick the page they’ll list in the ranking, – you pick the landing page for paid search and track back promotion.  So watch the pages that draw search traffic and backtrack with an understanding of why it is behaving in a specific manner. Figure out the keywords that are generating traffic to those pages. Then adjust those pages so they make sense in a behavioral context.Use your analytics for more than PPC. Watch time spent on each organic landing page and test those pages. Find the best combination of headline, copy, layout and offer. Then do it again.Be creative. This means that the one product long tail company needs to get more creative than those competitive companies with many products and many reasons to navigate the site.

Search Behavior Fact 4: Social Networking will matter.

This one’s been evident for consumer companies for a while, but even B to B is moving in this direction: Search engines are  adding bookmarking, stumbles, Diggs, Technorati, and other information into the equation. If you can get more folks to live at your site, or promote it to the top of Google Search wiki, or bookmark your site on Del.icio.us, your ranking’s are going to improve.

 

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Search Engine Trademark Best Practices… what every marketer should know.

Posted in MARKETING by Tom Levers on December 5, 2008
on-the-back1by Tom Levers

Can you build awareness from other brands ? 

No matter if you are using a “professional  SEM agency” or you’re a “PPC Do It Yourself-er “, a brand has a lot of value, so remember that its critical to be aware of the do’s and don’ts of  SEM Trademark best practices.

 

Despite the recession in 2008, U.S. paid search advertisement revenue is expected to reach $15.52 billion. Even with the holiday melt down internet marketing represents a 31.9% increase over 2007.  Search advertising is not immune to the economy and will motivate many to squeeze more out of their ad spending. So now more than ever the PPC marketer should be vigilant about the utilization and protection of a brand. There have been many search engine court cases involving keyword usage and trademark protection, by knowing best practices, you don’t need to fear or wonder about trademark infringement. 

 

This article reviews the state of the law, search engine company policies, as well as, legal methods to protect your trademark or use another trademark to enhance your visibility on the web. Trademark infringement is a popular topic for any business that develops a brand. There are the 4 basic elements of a claim: 1. Ownership of valid trademark, 2. Priority – earliest use, 3. Use in commerce in connection with the sale of goods services. (If the advertiser buys the trademark as a keyword but doesn’t use the keyword in the ad copy, there’s a huge split in opinion on whether or not this infringes on a trademark.) There is also a geographic split – in New York it appears to be no, in the rest of the country it appears to be yes and finally, 4. Likelihood of consumer confusion.

 

A couple of courts say that if there is a purchase of a keyword without the keyword in the ad copy, it does not confuse the consumer. Another court says that consumers will always be confused and the plaintiff should always win. So presently the courts don’t really have consistent opinions. If a consumer is confused about brand representation, there are a variety of defenses; referencing the trademarked owner. For example in the Tiffany vs. Ebay case, Ebay was buying advertising on the Tiffany trademarked products, and was excused because the use was nominative – “Ebay is a great place to buy Tiffany products”.

 

There are some basic search engine trademark policies.  A summary of the top three search vendors reveals Yahoo and MSN have banned certain types of keyword and ad buys based on the trademark.  Google allows bidding on trademarked keywords, but does not allow reference of the trademark in the ad copy. This approach may be more helpful. Google trademark complaint procedures for US, UK, Ireland and Canada, won’t investigate keywords, only ad text. Outside the US, UK, Ireland and Canada, they will investigatex-os1usage in both keywords and ad text. Yahoo trademark approach has the opposite procedure; they don’t allow users to bid on trademarked keywords. Ebay has a complaint procedure, it’s called the VeRO program (Verified rights owner) and they can and will kick people out. You just fill out a form, it’s easy, and you don’t need an attorney.

 

How to use your mark so you don’t abandon or misuse: First always use proprietary notices: “this TM is registered”. Distinguish your mark in print perhaps. Use it in all caps, or use it with the first letter as the capital (though don’t use it is a proper noun because then it becomes generic. For example, Escalator lost trademark rights because they used it as a noun, and now an escalator is the generic word for “moving stairs”). Also don’t use it as a verb, like “TiVo your favorite TV show”, you should use it as an adjective, like I’ll use my TiVo DVR. Never change your mark. So if you update or modernize your mark, be cautious of the trademark implications.

 

How to legally use another company’s trademark: There are limits on how company A can use company B’s trademark. Trademark use is prohibited if it causes confusion. But there are ways you can use it. The issue of what is and isn’t likely can cause confusion – just ask yourself the question, why am I using someone else’s’ trademark? To identify a genuine product or service… To let users know you are offering a product or service… To make a comparison between your product and another, for example, you are marketing a generic version of a product…  There is no other readily identifiable way of identifying the trademarked products or services.

 

Infringement is created when a company is trying: 1.To get a search engine listing when your website has nothing to do with the trademarked product, 2.To get a more prominent organic listing when your website has nothing to do with the trademarked product, 3.To get more traffic to your site, 4.To divert a competitor’s traffic to your site

 

So if you have the right answer to “why I am using this trademark?” here are some permitted uses: 1.When your website sells the genuine trademarked product, 2.In a meta tag when the website sells the genuine product, 3. In a meta tag when the website sells the generic version of the trademarked product.=

 

Limits on use: You can say, “We have the best prices on TiVo DVRs”, or “Our Video Editor is better than NEROs”, or “We sell the generic version of Lipitor”. You can’t use the trademark more than necessary (Orbitz,Orbitz,Orbitz), or in a more prominent form than necessary. You can not overly exclaim a trademark (We are not Orbitz, We are not Orbitz, We are not Orbitz). You can’t use a trademarked logo instead of the word and you can’t falsely claim sponsorship. A new use is when a marketer writes about a product or service, and this comes up in the search listings results, when it has nothing to do with the site. The articles are usually written to drive traffic to the site. Presently there has not yet been any US case law, but if abused this will be addressed.

 

Your brand has a lot of value, so remember that its critical to be vigilant to the do’s and do not’s of SEM Trademarks. Now that more and more marketing is not on paper you need to protect your brand using contemporary methods. You may find that you could increase your results just by following these SEM trademark best practices.

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