Tom Levers

Sales and Methods of Understanding

LightBulb“Methods of Understanding” will get what you need done in your business.

No matter if it is working to build a “Company Culture”, or becoming a sales “Rain Maker”, or “Marketing Positioner” of the next Widget… you will get further if you apply the toolkit of how individuals use “Methods to Understand”.

You may know Sales Methodologies, but the “Rain Maker” applies Systems of Understanding. Most natural “Rain Makers” unknowingly identify how others are using these various types of Understanding Methods, they just identify these throughout all aspects of their lives… without even knowing they are using them. By identifying what individuals use when they try to understand can enlighten the situation. 

WARNING! This is not for everyone. Some people are so locked into their individual method that if you are a “hammer” everything looks like a “nail”! The “Rain Maker”, the “Corporate Motivator”, and the  “Customer Requirement Aggregator” ” all must identify which “Methods of Understanding” is being used and how to adapt to it. 

We all instinctively lean toward some of these approaches rather than others, but the key to applying these principles  is to internalize the different constructs so we can better communicate. The different types are:

  • Attribution – we need to attribute cause, that supports our ego.
  • Constructivism – we use constructs as perceptual categories.
  • Framing – mental combinations that affect perception.
  • Schema – structure to organize and interpret the world.
  • Personal Constructs – constructs represent understanding.
  • Symbolic Interaction  – we derive meaning around symbols.
  • Objectification –  we simplify complex things into concrete images.
  • Story Models – We piece together complex situations into stories to build understanding.

Lets first cover the first four in this article and try to identify after reading how you and others are using them in your professional and personal life.

 

Attribution

We all have a need to explain the world, both to ourselves and to other people, attributing cause to the events around us. This gives us a greater sense of control. When explaining behaviour, it can affect the standing of people within a group (especially ourselves).

FaceWhen another person has erred, we will often use internal attribution, saying it is due to internal factors. When we have erred, we will more likely use external attribution, attributing causes to situational factors rather than blaming ourselves. We will take credit, due to the good business skills that were applied. And vice versa. We will attribute the successes of competitive rivals to external ‘advantages’. 

When a football team wins, supporters say ‘we won’. But when the team loses, the supporters say ‘they lost’. Our attributions are also significantly driven by our emotional and motivational drives. Blaming other people and avoiding personal recrimination is a very real self-serving attributions. We will also make attributions to defend what we perceive as attacks. We will point to injustice in an unfair world. 

In practice, we often tend to go through a two-step process, where we start with an automatic internal attribution, followed by a slower consideration of whether an external attribution is more appropriate. Key to this is, if we are hurrying or are distracted, we may not get to this second step. This makes internal attribution more likely than external attribution.
Example of Use: I have no support and no budget there for I cannot do a good job.

Using it: Beware of being a complainer (i.e. making internal attributions about the situation). Also beware of making excuses (external attributions) that lead you to repeat mistakes and leads to Cognitive Dissonance in others when they are making internal attributions about you.

Defending: Watch out for people making untrue attributions.

Constructivism

We try to make sense of the world by making use of constructs, which are perceptual categories that we use when evaluating things.

People who have many different and abstract constructs have greater flexibility in understanding the world and are cognitively complex, whilst others are cognitively simple. Cognitively complex people are better able to accept both complex and inconsistent messages. They also have a greater need to understand things and will question deeply anything that is new to them. However, once persuaded, they stay persuaded and are less likely to change their minds as their new constructs will support the argument.

Example: Some people have a construct about being fat that says fat people are lazy and greedy. Others may perceive it as a medical condition. 

Using it: Help cognitively complex people to build new constructs that support your argument. Do not bother with this detail for the cognitively simple.

Defending: Do not let others take charge when building new constructs.

Framing

A frame is the combination of beliefs, values, attitudes, mental models, and so on which we use to perceive a situation. We effectively look through this frame in the way we would look through tinted spectacles. The frame significantly effects how we infer meaning and hence understand the situation.

Example: I see a holiday in the hills as an opportunity for outdoor exercise. My friend sees is as a chance for a quiet read. My son sees it as a long period of boredom.

Using it: Change elements of a person’s frame (reframing) and hence how they view the world). This is a powerful persuasive technique. 

Being able to see things through many frames yourself gives you a broader perspective and able to understand more of how others think.

Defending: When people ask you to look at something from another viewpoint, be aware that there are many viewpoints, many of which are valid and legitimate. 

ShoesSchema

A schema is a mental structure

Schemas are also self-sustaining, and will persist even in the face of disconfirming evidence. This is because if something does not match the schema, such as evidence against it, it is ignored. Some schema are easier to change than others, and some people are more open about changing any of their schemas than other people. Schemas are also known as mental models, concepts, mental representations and knowledge structures(although definitions are different–for example some define mental models as modeling cause-effect only).

Schemas affect what we notice, how we interpret things and how we make decisions and act. They act like filters, accentuating and downplaying various elements. We use them to classify things, such as when we ‘pigeon-hole’ people. They also help us forecast, predicting what will happen. We even remember and recall things via schemas, using them to ‘encode’ memories.

Schemas have inferences and appear very often in the attribution of cause. The multiple necessary cause schema is one where we require at least two causes before a ‘fit’ to the schema is declared. Schemas are often shared within cultures, allowing short-cut communications. Every word is, in effect, a schema, as when you read it you receive a package of additional inferred information.

We tend to have favourite schema which we use often. When interpreting the world, we will try to use these first, going on to others if they do not sufficiently fit. 

Example: Some people dislike police because they have a schema of police as people who perceive everyone as guilty until proven innocent. Other people feel safe around police as their schemas are more about police as brave protectors. 

Using it: Find people’s schemas around the area of interest, then either create trust by utilizing their schema or reframe to change their schema.

Defending: Become more self-aware, knowing your own schemas and why there are useful for you. When people try to change them, you can then more rationally understand whether your or their schemas are better.

This is a lot to absorbs,  so look for these in your every day business or personal life and check back for the second part of this Article after I try this myself!

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Blogs – the DoDo Bird of SEO

Posted in BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT, DEMAND GENERATION, MARKETING, Partner alliances, PUBLIC RELATIONS, SEM by Tom Levers on September 30, 2009
The DoDo Bird of SEO

The DoDo Bird of SEO

Have you started a blog only to lose interest, or stop contributing  because no one is reading it?  What should you do differently?

There’s all sorts of  blogs and yet so many have content that is never read.  In fact, there are a tremendous number of business blogs that are not realizing much of their potential. Take this blog as an example.

Why? Because it is not optimized…. so focused on content creation that even though I know what to do… I do not use my own knowledge.

This is very much the same scenario that occurred with web sites  pre-and post tech bubble. I worked with lots of computer industry partners and I mean Lots of them. But afterthe largest management consulting sites got their site up and running, the traffic didn’t come by itself. So we optimized for search engines and that was the start of my SEO experience. Blogs can generate traffic without search engines, but WITH search engines it can be even better.

With blogs, there exist as many or more optimization opportunities to optimize as with a web site. The thing about internet marketing is that there is no “one right way” to solve a single problem. So much of the advice and commentary about content optimization for search engines at conferences and on blogs is tactical. While most blog software is more search engine friendly out of the box than many web sites, the opportunities for blog optimization are readily available. There is a long list of blog optimization tactics to employ.Why optimize your blog?

  • Increase rankings of the blog on BOTH regular search engines as well as blog/RSS search engines
  • Increase traffic to the blog from multiple sources such as social search and social bookmarking sites (del.icio.us, Digg, Furl or Blogmarks)

A blog is just a website that uses a content management system, so most standard SEO tactics apply. There are also optimization tactics specific to blogs.

Consider keywords when writing your blog post titles. Some blog software allows plugins that can suggest keywords. Otherwise, you can use Google Suggest or one of these free keyword suggestion tools: Digital Point, SEO Book or Google AdWords Keyword Tool. Keywords should NOT determine your content (unless it’s an AdSense blog).
Optimize the template. Make sure post titles appear in the title tag and append the title tag (hard code) with the most important phrase for your blog.

Neanderthal SEO for Blogs

Neanderthal SEO for Blogs

Also use the blog post title as the permalink. If you’re using keywords in the blog post title, then they will occur as anchor text in the permanent post link. While you’re at it, just make the post title a permalink.

Make it easy for your blog readers to subscribe and include RSS feed subscription buttons or “chicklets” in a side bar or on a dedicated Subscription Info page. Here’s a handy RSS Feed Button creation tool.

Optimize Categories. When you create categories for your blog, be sure to consider keywords in the titles. When you post, be sure to default to a general category that is relevant no matter what the post is about. Choose multiple categories on each post when appropriate.

Social bookmarking sites can be excellent sources of traffic to your blog, so be sure to make it easy for readers to bookmark your blog posts. You can do this by adding some code to your blog template for each of the major social bookmarking sites. Here’s a tool for social bookmarking links. Submit your blog to RSS and Blog directories. Also submit the blog to regular directories such as (DMOZ, JoeAnt, GoGuides, MSN Business Central, etc) that have categories for blogs.

There are many benefits to publishing a business blog and improved search engine visibility is one of the most popular.  It’s pretty common advice to hear: start a blog and the fresh content will attract links, improving your search results.  Such tactical advice can be very effective.

Unfortunately, the advice gets filtered and distorted, not unlike what happens in the game “telephone” kids play. Pretty soon one or more blogs are implemented for the sole purpose and expectation of improving search engine visibility and nothing else. At least nothing else that’s accountable.

What’s wrong with this picture?   Blogs started solely for SEO objectives will inevitably fail.

Here are a few reasons why:

1. Lack of planning and oversight – After the honeymoon of starting a blog wears off, those tasked with writing content often get distracted by their other responsibilities. Bit by bit, posts look less and less like keyword optimized web pages and sink back to the familiar writing styles common to public relations and corporate marketing. Gone are the keywords that consumers are searching on. Gone is the traffic that used to come from search engines.

If SEO efforts persist, they can get sloppy without ongoing oversight either by an outsite SEO consultant or an internal blog champion (more about that in our next post). Keyword usage in blog posts can become disparate or worse, evolve into a keyword stuffing exercise.

2. No passion for the topic – With over 100 million blogs indexed by Technorati, it’s a wonder what happened to the 90% or more than have been abandoned or that don’t post more often than every 4 months. It takes commitment, thought out ideas and a sincere interest in a topic to be able to blog about it on an ongoing basis over the long term.

Can you imagine watching a 30 minute TV show or 2 hour movie you’re not interested in? How long does that last? How about a job you’re not interested in? Do you really excel at it? Do you do the best job possible and and do you stick with it? No, no and no.

As a result, bloggers who are not personally interested in a topic will encounter blogger’s block quickly and with a shallow level of knowledge on what’s being blogged about, readers lose interest quickly and do not return, subscribe or link to RSS and Blog directories. Also submit to the regular directories such as  (DMOZ, JoeAnt, GoGuides, MSN Business Central)  

 

Blog Extinction

Blog Extinction

Ping the major RSS feed and Blog search engines each time you post. This can be configured with blog software such as Movable Type or WordPress to work automatically. If you’re using Blogger.com, then you can do this manually with Pingomatic or Pingoat.

Comments and Trackbacks – Be sure your blog software is configured to send a trackback ping to blogs that you cite within your posts. Pay attention to press releases distributed by PRWeb. If you cite a release, and ping the trackback link, the press release will in turn link to your blog. This is better for driving traffic than for link popularity.

Make useful comments on other blogs. Your name will be linked to the blog url that you enter. Do NOT make comments that offer no value to the blog post. Do NOT use keywords in the field for your name, use your name or blog name.

Offer RSS to Email. Almost 30% of blog traffic comes from readers that perfer to read blog posts via email. There are several free services available for this including: FeedBlitz , Squeet, Zookoda (this one is more for using blog posts as a weekly newsletter), RMail and Bloglet.

No matter how many optimization tactics you employ on a blog, there is no substitute for quality content. Blog optimization is only as effective as the quality and usefulness of the content you’re optimizing.

Here are some simple steps for managing blog content, long term:  Create a keyword glossary, much like you would for a website SEO project. Identify an editorial guide as well as post types and key topics. Assign a blog champion, someone that “owns” the success/failure of the blog. The blog champion will provide content and editorial oversight as well as recruit other contributors.

The blog champion performs another important function, feedback to the contributors. This goes beyond a simple “thank you” but may also include reporting on the number of comments on posts contributed, inbound links, increases in RSS subscribers and mentions of the blog post on other blogs. Providing individual as well as overall feedback to contributors helps them see what impact their efforts are making.

Socialize.Blogs are a big part of what makes up social media, so it’s important that bloggers are social for a successful blogging effort. A few of the ways blogs can be social include:

Wrap up For a successful business blogging effort that leverages search engine optimization, it’s important that the blog serves a functional purpose intented to help the business reach a particular goal. SEO is involved in order to extend the reach and “discoverability” of the blog.

Blog optimization is both a one time event with the templates but is also an ongoing process involving keyword glossaries that help determine post level keyword usage, internal anchor text and off site anchor text.  Running out of ideas and people to contribute to the blog can mean certain death, so be creative with content sourcing and formats. Listen to what blog readers respond to and give feedback on to guide editorial.

Blog software offers many social features. Use them! Grow a network that leverages the blog as resource and as a way to recognize contributors.  Monitor real time content opportunities as well as blog analytics so you can offer the kind of feedback that motivates continued contributions both from the C-Suite in the form of funding and from the B-Suite in the form of content and comments.

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Partner channels are conduits of communications

Posted in BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT, DEMAND GENERATION, MARKETING, Partner alliances by Tom Levers on September 15, 2009

BRAND PARTNERS
BRAND PARTNERS

By Tom Levers

Remember Hierarcial Marketing – where product design, price and promotion determine demand? This traditional model places communications alongside the other variables of the marketing mix.

With the Internet as a primary communication tactic and the Partner Alliance as a multiplyer of the direct sales organization, you may want to use a more Counter-Intuitive Marketing Model !

 

Business to business organizations have gotten creatively lazy to the idea of  tactical integration of communications messages. To rapidly deploy new products in the future they will have to embrace the idea of the strategy of vertical integration to take advantage of the new marketing methods for communications – ie. speaking with one voice from the CEO’s office right down to the sales and tech people is key to rapid product demand.

Because of the increased importance of company-wide brand values in providing competitive advantage, marketing is becoming a way of delivering a communications strategy, rather than the other way round. 

In the “Traditional” model, communications starts with the company, and marketing becomes part of the ‘delivery mechanism’ for the communications strategy. It does not consider various conditional factors that determine primary and secondary forms of communications.

What are the implications of this vision of vertically-integrated marketing communications? Lets first understand the definition of Vertical Integration in general business… it is when a company expands its business into areas that are at different points of the same production path, ie the  Operating System Software company decides to make Software Utilities that it would normally need or the Auto company decides to go into the tire business.

An obvious marketing translation is the importance of integrating internal and external marketing communications. ie  All the employees are highly credible ambassadors to its external public – both in what they say to their communities and the service they provide to their customers. Both word of mouth and performance can be enhanced to the benefit of the organisation by sustained  internal marketing.

 A second implication of the strategic vertical marketing integration is the importance of developing partner channels as conduits of information, as well as , products and services.

Marketing frequently differentiates between ‘push’ and ‘pull’ strategies. ‘Push’ strategies ( direct selling) offer incentives to channels , pushing them towards the end user. ‘Pull’ strategies, on the other hand, use directed techniques ( advertising ) to stimulate demand in order to pull the product, or service, through the channels.pepsi_besser_lf29jun59

‘’Pull-“to find a need and satisfying it”, but Push -“create the awareness that a need exists”… metaphor rankles the old school traditionalist . 

Although Start-Up ventures have no product category established… no awareness of need, so if they have a need,  Vertically Integrated Marketing-“what is the fastest methods to get attention”  is the key driving communications tactics !

Push and pull strategies are not mutually exclusive. For example, a Trade Event directed solely at the end user will be seen by alliance partners, analysts, even competitors who validate and bolster their confidence in the category of product or service concerned.

While it is necessary to operationalise marketing communications strategy by combining a number of different disciplines and tactics, customers experience brands in their own terms. In order to communicate in a customer-centred way, organisations need to consider how their brand messages are received. 

The customer-centered communications methods can be broken down into ten (10) sources, but clearly there are infinate ways of a prospect hearing, seeing, or experiencing your brand. Public relations, word of mouth/tech, events, forms of media advertising,  sales promotion activity, internet searches, text messages, direct marketing, your direct sales, and finally alliance partners that can be extensive,  and only partially controllable.

The uncertainty of partners alliances makes it all the more important to think through brand contact points thoroughly, in order to gauge their potential implications. The key is to maintain that an organisation can improve its management of this process by a careful consideration of the different ways in which customers come into contact with the brand – offering a standardised  framework for action planning.

The traditional distinctions between push, pull and profile strategies  are giving way to ways of analysing and planning marketing communications which recognise the complexity of how customers receive messages.

Finding out how customers access marketing communications reveals their preferences in receiving information. As active recipients of brand messages, they can screen out the irrelevant and the inconvenient. Observing their preferences in this regard can be a source of genuine competitive advantage.

A way of improving your marketing is by improveing the singularity of your brand communications strategy…  from the point of view of the customer it will look as if your Brand is everywhere.
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Evaluating Partner Alliance Opportunity

Posted in BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT, DEMAND GENERATION, MARKETING by Tom Levers on March 19, 2009
Partner Marketing

Partner Marketing

Recently a major management consulting firm delivered the final engagement  “Evaluating Partner Relationships”,these are some of the general conclusions.

Partners deliver new sources of revenue, and are the genesis of efficiency, speed and market share. Often large organizations have too many and the small have none.

The complexity of variables to facilitate relationships is daunting, but partnerships can validate a new  product or service. It is the “Divergent ” components of partners that influence the  “business natural selection” process.

There are  Six Indicators or factors that significantly impact the  success and failure of a Partnership outcome. These are:

New Partner Attractors – Sometimes partners get together because of hot topics (ie environmentalism), some because of market buzz (company success), others have “hot” technology (technical advantages), more have functional ability, and for some it is the quality of people.  The true attractor is if the Partnership delivers a  “new value” to the customer.

Technical Domain Competency – The more similar the area of domain the less divergent, the less dependent and the more an organization can rely on in-house expertise rather than the partner.  Because an organization has a strong internal technical resource the emphasis shouldn’t necessarily measure technical competency, but more important it is the experience of doing (i.e. the number of successful implementations completed or product sold), and how complex or amount of time the domain discipline requires, is really how domain competency is measured.

Professionalism – The more strategic a solution or the larger the account, the more likely the final customer will expect a high level of “Competency” and “Professionalism”. It is the combination of “Competency” and “Professionalism” or “Service Quality” that creates the reliability of the  product and ultimate service solution.

Other key values are localization, demand generation, and sales capabilities that allow their team to drive new “up-sell” and “cross-sell” opportunities. These new capabilities provide a reasons to engage with existing clients, and a new way to introduce yourself (a foot in the door) with a new client. This can be supported by:

Localization – Thinking locally, looking local, behaving like a local, while acting globally is the key. It provides client connectedness, capability relevance, and local resilience.

Demand Generation – Hot markets can create leads from the brand and be easily integrated into the existing corporate marketing, such as Webinares, Events, Case Studies, Thought Leadership, SEM (see SEM Channel Partner Methods ) and more. If a Partner Demand Generation capability is a Pull-through only relationship often a “Technology Alliance” (i.e.”Intel Inside”) exists.  So often when competitive products or services enter the market the functional differences may not retain as much value (ie. AMD shows up and the only customer difference is “No Sticker” on the PC). The Partner successes use this to strengthen divergence by delivering partner marketing programs and tactics that both Push and Pull interest.

The Sales Cycle – Partners will likely add “speed to market” and “new market opportunity ” when selling  a complete partner solution. Some brands have a huge opportunity leveraging existing sales organizations that utilize their partner sales stakeholders. By having a partner sales force that supports the different vertical disciplines and complete product solution throughout the end-user customer buying process, rapid growth can flourish. Establishing the combined partner sales process for different products and services across different kinds of markets improves touch points, cycle speed and probability.

Divergence defines a stronger Partner

This is why ideally the best outcome for a Partner Program is “all of the listed factors of divergence”. Understanding these principals ievaluating-alliance-partner-relationships2s key to creating a strong Partner / Brand. By putting together a business relationship that generates long-term Partner Alliances, the use of divergence outreach can differentiate when direct competition creates market confusion. When multiple vendors and sub brands start to appear, creating similar functional value. Building the right Partner organization can deliver the additional momentum and breadth to support confidence and expertise that sustains market leadership.

A non-proprietary summary of the final delivery of a “Partner Marketing ” Engagement, from a major Global Management Consulting Firm for their client.
*Over 50 partner interviews were conducted for this engagement. Applying Organizational Science principals of Divergence has been used to predict outcome by defining the qualitative metric  of “New” ability over the alliance “Interdependence” (N/I)  delivered. The quantitative component is composed of organizational “Quality” as a multiplier of the “Functional” execution that uses a fraction of “Market” size and forecast market potential (Q x F)/M. This is then built into an Input /Output engine to quantify the “Opportunity” potential of a Partner relationship.->

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The Design Science of Partner Business Development…

Posted in BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT, MARKETING by Tom Levers on February 26, 2009

partner-alliances6With the downturn in the business landscape the challenges for growth and profitability continue. Using partners and improving  existing alliances can:

Reduce marketing and sales costs;
Increase new markets;
Reduce cycle time;
Improve the quality of sales effectiveness.

No matter what the product  or service the key to designing a partner sales and marketing engine is to multiply results.

When Best-of-Breed Vendors have  good Business Partners they successfully grow.  These partnerships can  kick start the efficient cornerstone of new business growth through the creation of cost leadership, differentiation and focus.

With new business models emerging from the impact of the economy, and customer demand of higher value and lower cost solutions; companies must use better organizational best practices to find ways to deliver what customers want. Partner alliances help to turn an organizations isolated competitive challenge into a new business development opportunity.

I started learning this when I worked for one of the first companies in the US to develop a 3 tier computer reseller organization. This company did not build the hardware and it did not build the application software… it made everything work! We allowed brand name hardware vendors to deliver unique niche vertical applications solutions… and make a lot of profit doing it. It was the partner model that was one of the keys to their rapid growth.

Now partner alliances are common. However, the number of partnerships publicly launched  has  recently fallen, typically due to poor execution. Some organizations just slap a partner program together and are not committed to the detailed execution required. Other partner organizations need to cut loose a partner participant because they achieved  their original objective. No matter what organization,  a successful partner organization needs best practices to guide their success. Many alliance organizations have developed a design criteria requirement definition for their strategic business development channel.

partner-strategies1These are only a few of the more important generic design criteria of any Partner Business Development effort:

1. Barriers to Build – Determine when communicating to the customer your value, that it is more economical and easier to achieve by creating an alliance than a direct marketing / sales effort. Typically partner alliances are developed when a partner has a service or domain expertise complementary to the need, or when there is little in-house knowledge of the final complete deliverable of product or service, or there is a high barrier to customer availability. ( i.e. Sometimes it takes too much time, expertise, and money for the prospect to be willing to talk to you, but they will talk to a partner.) Even when you have a strong direct marketing organization or strong service deliverable, multiple touch points around your customer make for a much stronger sales and service organization.

2. Choose the best partner – Look at how a potential partner would fit. Both companies must be able to enjoy short-term and long-term wins from the relationship. That’s the potential of the alliance. But executive and operating resources are the commitment for whether or not the partnership will succeed. Without these commitments, partnerships often fall apart.

3. Create a business plan. Key components include a clear view of the customer value proposition; realistic, shared goals; effective executive sponsor relationships; and investment tied to milestones and successes. Perhaps the most frequent mistake companies make is rushing out an announcement of a new alliance or partnership without having first done the due diligence needed to ensure success.

4. Act on the results – The business plan and alliance goals will determine what should be measured. Establishing up-front goals and mutually agreed-upon metrics for measuring progress, or lack thereof, are two critical success factors to ensure alliances drive top-line revenue for both companies. Track alliances’ success with detailed operational dashboards customized to reflect the specific business goals and metrics of each relationship. Values can include quantifiable data like market share gain and market acceleration, joint revenue/contribution, customer satisfaction, and new solutions launched but also qualitative metrics such as progress in standards efforts of mutual interest.

5. Know when to walk away – Partners must review the alliance in light of the established metrics and determine if it has been successful. Important at this stage is not to see alliance end-of-life as personal or business failure. Rather, this stage may even be a reflection of success – that the partnership has achieved its objectives – or a consequence of changed market conditions or business strategy on the part of one of the partners. It’s important to plan every bit as diligently for alliance end-of-life or transition as for alliance launch. Customers need to be protected. Relationships must be kept professional because there could be another joint opportunity waiting down the road.

6. Build best-in-class capabilities – Identify the skills needed, hiring the right people, building a solid partner management system, and having a strong commitment from the operations management team are all critical. The company has developed an in-house team that can rapidly design a customized curriculum for each new partner to get  up-to-speed on whatever knowledge they need, thus ensuring consistent, quality and service.

Alliance Partners Anticipate  Needs

The Bottom-Line Impact is that when executed correctly this key organizational business strategy delivers customer benefit and the partner organization continues to focus on their core competencies while extending its products and services to new markets.

“Best-of -Breed” solution Partners help to differentiate beyond the “Suite Vendor” or “Acquisition/Agregator” competitors.  The customer value that a high quality “Best-of-Breed” vendor delivers in focus, domain dicpline and customer commitment over the many “broad-brush” organizations privides depth that it can not deliver alone. Instead of the customer going out and trying to fit various solution pieces together, the well executed alliance partner organization uses it’s multiple stake holders to anticipate their customer needs better, resulting in increased sales and customer satisfaction.